Friday, May 29, 2020

ALL GRADES VIRTUAL FIELD TRIPS - DUE WED., JUNE 3RD

This week's lesson is due Wed. June 3rd
You are going on another virtual field trip.  That means you'll be visiting a place on the computer using YouTube as your means of travel.  These videos all have something to do with ART.  You may be visiting a famous architectural marvel or a special museum. You may learn about the art of a particular group of people or the wonders that they created.  You might even journey back in time 40,000 years to see the first work that artists ever made.

Please view the video I've chosen for your grade.

Click on the link below to access the video posted below your grade level.
Go to the "Full Screen " mode to see the video.  Click on the "Skip Ad" tab on the right side of the screen to go directly to the video

PRE-K AND KINDERGARTEN
Learn about The Mona Lisa - the most recognized painting in the world
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCOI90wO_3o

ADAPTIVE - Watch "Lava",  Disney Pixar's Short Film from the movie  "Inside Out" 

1ST GRADE
Learn about The Eiffel Tower – the famous monument in France
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZgoqVUqICs

2ND GRADE
Learn about building the Statue of Liberty – A Symbol of Freedom

3RD GRADE - (page down past the camel and the red-violet box)
Learn about the very first artists from Prehistoric Europe – “Cave Art”, A National Geographic video

4TH GRADE
See the glass-blower work some brilliant magic to create those magical spheres of beauty that we call marbles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cXy7gxUtbU

5TH GRADE
Visit New Jersey’s Grounds for Sculpture - Gardens and Outdoor Museum


6TH GRADE
Visit Fonthill Castle, “The Mercer Museum and Tile Works – Three Places, One Story”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MlMSsluyfU



7TH GRADE
See the Riches of the Boy King of Egypt, Tutankhamun, from more than 3,000 years ago – “The Discovery of  King Tut”, in three parts 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMNnQnqPLa4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9u3or9Eedw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DD9vYBV6ZAY

8TH GRADE
The History of Notre Dame – What’s at Stake
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTilOMlJYes






Saturday, May 23, 2020

KINDERGARTEN POPSICLE DUE FRI., 5/29

Here’s a fun (and tasty) drawing lesson for you courtesy of Art Hub for Kids.  This artist always has
young friends to draw with him.   You can see how different a drawing can be even when artists use
the same step - by - step directions.  He shows you that you don’t have to make your drawing look
like his to be a good drawing.

Today’s drawing is a cartoon POPSICLE.   Watch the video 2 times so you can see that he uses
simple shapes to draw.
  Then, you can create your own design for the ice cream flavors, toppings
and add-ons.


Drawing a popsicle       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFHt-tbBG98
                                   You can click the "skip ads" tab on the right side of the video screen                       


Friday, May 22, 2020

PRE-K AND ADAPTIVE POPSICLE, DUE FRI., 5/29

Here’s a fun (and tasty) drawing lesson for you courtesy of Art Hub for Kids.  This artist always has young friends to draw alongside with him.   You can see how different a drawing can be even when artists use the same step - by - step directions.  He shows you that you don’t have to make your drawing look like his to be a good drawing. 
Today’s drawing is a cartoon POPSICLE.   Watch the video 2 times so you can see that he uses simple shapes to draw.  Then, you can create your own design for the ice cream flavors, toppings and add-ons.

Drawing a popsicle   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFHt-tbBG98

You can click the "skip ads" tab on the right side of the video screen

4TH GRADE POP ART CAN OF SOUP DUE FRI., 5/29


4TH GRADE POP ART CAN
The Pop Art movement started in the United Kingdom and the United States during the mid to late 1950s. Pop artists included imagery from popular and mass culture, such as advertising and comic books and mundane mass-produced cultural objects.  Pop is short for popular.
One of the most famous objects in pop art is the Campbell’s soup can and it is one of Andy Warhol’s most recognizable subjects.  Like other pop artists, he used bold and repetitive images, and bright colors. Here are a few of Warhol’s paintings.

  


Use the illustrations below to understand how to make the can appear to be 3D.  Look at the simple rectangle below made with straight lines.  Just by changing the top and bottom lines and making the lines curved, the shape becomes a form - a 3D-appearing cylinder.

Your assignment is to design a new variety of soup in a can.  You can copy the Campbell's brand and label or invent your own company.  

1 – get out a can and hold it directly in front of you in line with your eyes 
2 – notice how you can not see the top or bottom of the can
3 – now lower the can in front of you at chin height
4 – you can now see that the top of the can appears to be an oval
5 – if the top of the can is curved (because you KNOW that a can is a cylinder), the            bottom is, too
6 – lightly draw the sides of the rectangle about the size of a real can – use a ruler &            pencil
7 – erase the bottom horizontal line and replace it with a gently curving line
8 – mirror the front of the top of the can with the curve at the bottom
9 – now draw the back of the top of the can with a curved line that is the same contour        (outline)

You can make the soup variety be reasonable or totally silly and far-fetched, as long as the can shape appears 3D and the top and bottom edges of the LABEL mirror the curve of the CAN.  For example, maybe you’ll design a can of bubblegum soup or sauerkraut soup or dandelion soup or pretzel soup or crayon soup.  It’s up to you.  Add color in the Warhol way – bright and bold colors that people would notice and find attractive on a shelf. 
Although Andy Warhol often did multiple images of the same thing, YOU only have to draw one can of soup.

HINT: If you strive for a high degree of 3D-ness, notice how the lid and bottom of the can extend a wee bit past the edges (the sides) of the cylinder and draw it that way.

2ND GRADE BIG MOUTH FISH DUE FRI., 5/29


Here’s a fun drawing surprise for MARE.  Create a fish from your imagination or draw one that really exists.  This lesson is part drawing and part paper-folding which makes the “surprise”.  Below you can see one artist’s version of a big mouth fish. Underneath those pictures is a diagram of the folds and guidelines to make the fish “big” and written directions.  Be sure to watch both videos before you draw.  You are the artist, so you decide whether to make a real underwater scene or a silly or otherwise imaginary one.  That will determine what you draw in the fish’s big mouth.



Sunday, May 10, 2020

8TH GRADE MARE TLINGIT POLAR SEAS RAVEN DRAWING, DUE 5/29


Your Mare topic in 8th grade is the Polar Seas region –especially the land and sea animals who live there and support the people and the ecosystem.  You’ll be focusing on the art of the Tlingit, who like the Haida and Inuit, are indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast of North America.  Among the many critters that are found in these polar regions, the raven is of special importance.  Raven is the culture hero of Tlingit legends. He is a revered and benevolent transformer figure who helps the people, and shapes their world for them, but at the same time, he is also a trickster character, and many Tlingit stories about Raven have to do with his frivolous or poorly thought out behavior getting him into trouble.You may remember the story of “How Raven Gave Light to the World” from Mrs. Paola’s class when you were in third grade.  She called his story “a trickster tale”.



1          You will be creating a drawing of Raven, in the traditional drawing style of the Tlingit.
2          Look at the attached sample sheet for examples of the drawing/design style of these artists.
3          Watch the video below for a directed drawing assignment.  Watch it all the way through a first time. 
4          Then, gather your drawing tools – white paper, pencil and (preferably) a black permanent marker (to prevent smearing).  Later, if you choose, you can add color to your drawing using the colors used by Tlingit artists for their work – red, plus turquoise, green or blue. If you plan on using paint, use a paper that is heavier than copy paper.
5          Then, draw along with the featured artist, step – by – step, to complete your picture of the raven.  You may instead choose to create one of the other polar seas animals in this same style, after you’ve watched the video, so that you can identify the characteristics of their artwork and use them in yours.


Video: Drawing The Raven  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEJV7fj6nZM
Resource: Native Languages of the Americas: Tlingit Legends, Myths and Stories

Post a copy of your work in an email or in GC


6TH GRADE OP ART SPHERE DUE 5/29

Born in Hungary in 1906, Victor Vasarely is best known for his important role in establishing the art movement known as Op Art, or Optical art.  He is called the “grandfather” of that movement because he created Op Art works long before the development of Op Art painting in the 1960s that used geometric forms to create optical effects. Op art uses optical illusions. Op art works are abstract, with many pieces created in black and white. They are intended to give the viewer the impression of movement, hidden images, flashing and vibrating patterns.


Many of Vasarely's works are built around the illusion that a 2D drawing of a circle LOOKS like a 3D sphere.  He creates the illusion using straight lines and curved lines together and uses either color or the contrast of black and white.  Look at the examples below.  Even without the addition of color, the black and white "sphere" appears to bulge toward the viewer.

Look at the simple rectangle below,  made with straight lines.  Just by changing the top and bottom lines and making the lines curved, the shape becomes a form - a 3D appearing cylinder.

Your assignment is to use the diagrams below to make your own optical illusion - making a 2D circle appear to be a 3D sphere. 

Gather a pencil, eraser, copy or other white paper and a ruler. 

1 .Draw a 7"- 8" ish circle right in the middle of the paper.  
2..Divide the circle evenly into quadrants (4).
3. Following  the contour (the curved outline of the circle),  draw a curved line from the top of the circle at the vertical line to the bottom of the vertical line.
4. Repeat with a second line.
5. Do steps 3 and 4 again on the right side of the vertical line.
6. Turn the paper 90 degrees.
7. Repeat steps 3 and 4 again. (ignore that there is a third line in the diagram).
8.Add tick marks at 1” intervals on all 4 sides of the square.
9. Connect the marks on opposite sides of the square with straight lines.
10. Color an alternating black and white checkerboard pattern starting in any of the 4 squares in the middle of the circle. You may use a color instead of black. or two colors. 



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7TH GRADE MARE OP ART DUE 5/29

Born in Hungary in 1906, Victor Vasarely is best known for his important role in establishing the art movement known as Op Art, or Optical art.  He is called the “grandfather” of that movement because he created Op Art works long before the development of op art painting in the 1960s that used geometric forms to create optical effects. Op art uses optical illusions. Op art works are abstract, with many pieces created in black and white. They are intended to give the viewer the impression of movement, hidden images, and flashing and vibrating patterns.



It is MARE time at OCS.  Your assignment is to incorporate Op Art principles and techniques in an artwork you create.  Your subject matter is any animal related to MARE.  You may draw from memory or get inspiration from a picture you have or download. 
 
1.     Decide on the animal you are going to draw.  Using pencil, draw the animal big enough to fill most of a piece of copy or drawing paper.  Plan ahead and draw it in the middle of the paper.  You only have to draw the contour (the outline).

2.     Draw lightly.  You will need to erase your pencil lines at the completion of the project.
3.     Starting at the top or bottom, and using a pen or permanent marker, draw a straight line across the width of the paper, parallel to the edge of the paper.  Using a ruler will give you the best result.  You may instead draw diagonally across the paper as in the picture below.

4.     Moving down the paper, from left to right, continue to draw straight lines across the paper on the empty part, about ¼” apart each time.
5.     When you bump into your drawing (in the middle of a line) stop making straight lines.  Instead, draw a curved line through the animal, but stop at the other side of your pencil line.  Then continue to draw a straight line until you reach the edge of the paper.

6.     Draw the next straight line until you reach your pencil drawing, curve the line through the animal with the same arc until you reach the other side of the animal, then finish with a straight line. Do this even if your animal has two + extensions, like the dolphin’s fin and body below.

7.    Continue this procedure until the entire page is covered with straight and curved lines.  You will see that the curving of the lines makes your animal “rise” from the paper in a 3-D illusion.
8.     Erase your pencil outline.

9.     You may lay a light wash of watercolor paint on your entire paper IF you have used a permanent drawing medium.  If you don’t plan on painting, you can draw all your lines with pencil instead, but be careful when you erase the outline.
                
Here are examples of a finished drawing that has also been painted with watercolor.
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3RD GRADE MARE TURTLE FROTTAGE DUE FRI., 5/29


Many art words like “collage” and “ papier mache” and “palette” come from the French language.  So does the word “frottage”.   It’s an art technique to use to get the look of texture in an artwork.  Let’s review what texture means.  Real texture means how the surface of a thing feels to the touch.  Can you think of some word examples of texture?  How does a brick feel if you rub your hand across it?  How about the hood of a brand-new car?  A cotton ball?  A tree trunk?  But, what if you rub your hand on a glossy photograph of a tree? That would be implied texture – the tree bark in the photo would look rough, but the shiny photo paper it is printed on would feel smooth.

When you draw or color a picture, you can make the paper look like it has a texture.  You can reproduce the texture of a surface by placing a piece of paper over the object and then rubbing the paper firmly with something that make marks.  This works because the object’s surface is raised.  Always use the side of the crayon or pencil, not the tip to make the rubbing.

1          For this MARE assignment, you will draw a picture of a turtle – one of the many animals that live in the wetlands. The turtle should be about the size of a piece of copy paper. 
2          Once you have made the line drawing of your turtle with pencil, you will fill in all the areas inside your outline drawing with pencil using the frottage technique.  
3          Look around your home and yard for any surfaces that have textures. Put your drawing on top of the textured surface and rub it with the pencil. Remember to use the side of the pencil.  Be sure to rub all the way to the edges of each section of your drawing that you are frottaging.  You’ll have 6 or more turtle sections in your drawing – head, 4 legs or flippers, and the shell (divide this up, too)
4          If you choose to use color with crayon instead of pencil for the frottage, (marker won’t work and neither will paint), you can make your turtle in any colors.  You don’t have to make the turtle appear real, but it does have to be frottaged.

Here are some examples of textured surfaces that you might use.  I’m sure you  can think of others:
Outside: Sidewalk, bricks, pavers, rock, wooden fence, metal furniture, vinyl siding, leaves, window screen, awning, tiles, shingles
Inside: vinyl or word or tile floor, wall tile, table cloth, lace, washcloth, carpet, basket


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Saturday, May 9, 2020

5TH GRADE OP ART SHAPE DRAWING DUE FRI., 5/29


Op art was a major development of painting in the 1960s (based on work by earlier artists like Victor Vasarely) that used geometric forms to create optical effects. Op art uses optical illusions. Op art works are abstract, with many pieces created in black and white. The viewer gets the impression of movement, hidden images, and pulsing or vibrating patterns by using simple shapes and lines.




  1              Your assignment is to create an Op Art drawing.  You may use a fish, dolphin or other sea life shape.  You may use a heart shape, a circle, a pear, a star or other simple shape.  You can even use a letter.   
  2              Use pencil to start.
  3              Draw a large simple shape somewhere on the paper.  It doesn’t need to be in the
       middle.
  4              You can draw multiple copies of the same shape inside the first one.
  5              Outline the shape with black or a color.  Put a dot somewhere on the page. 
  6              Draw an even number of lines from the dot to the edges of the paper.
  7              Color every other shape around the outside of the shape with either black or the
       color you chose.
  8              Color inside the letter with the opposite color (or black) that you used in the
       background.
  9              Color or leave the white paper.
10           When you color, be sure to use the three rules of good coloring.  In op art, the
       edges need to be clean – that means neat and smooth.

See the Starburst Letters diagram if you are having trouble understanding the steps

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4TH GRADE CONTINUOUS CONTOUR LINE DRAWING DUE 5/22


Today, Pablo Picasso is considered by some to be the greatest artist of the 20th century. Many people think he was one of the greatest in all of art history.  In his long life as an artist, he painted in many different styles.  His art belongs to times that art historians have named - like the Blue Period and the Rose Period.  He, with another artist named Braque, invented a new style of art called Cubism.  He added collage to his cubist work, too.  Later on, he did many drawing called Continuous Contour Drawings.  That means the object or person is drawn with one outline that is all connected.  The line only has a beginning and an end and the drawing tool is never lifted off the paper until the drawing is finished. We did drawings like this in third grade, remember?  YOU had to keep your eyes closed for the whole portrait you worked on.  Picasso didn’t close his eyes.
Here are some examples of Continuous Contour Drawings. The top three are artworks by Picasso. The bottom three are not.


 If you look closely and study these drawings, you can see that the contours– that means the outlines of all the shapes– of the objects and details are mostly drawn with one line.

 It is MARE time.  In 4th grade, you learn about the kelp forest, but for this project, you can choose any animal or object related to the things you study for MARE.  What you select doesn’t even have to be a living thing.  Two drawings are required.
You may draw from life or you may get inspiration from pictures of your object/critter.  Each drawing should be about the size of a piece of copy paper.
Plan ahead. Since you can’t lift your pencil (even if you pause), you sure cannot erase.  
REMEMBER – ONE LINE ONLY!

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2ND GRADE MARE FROG DRAWING DUE FRI., 5/22

As you can see, frogs come in many colors.  Often, they have markings that make them quite beautiful.  They can be stripped, spotted, “camouflaged” or just multi-colored.  Below are directions for a directed-drawing frog.  That means you can draw your own frog step by step using the 6 diagrams one at a time. 
 Draw your frog in pencil first, starting with the eyes. 

 When you are ready to add color, you may use paint, crayon, marker or any medium you want.

 If you wish, you can draw the shapes on the back of colored paper or even use a gift wrapping
 paper (or several papers) to add the details like eyes, tongue, and markings like spots or stripes.
                     
You do not have to make him look like a real frog. 

 Add color to the background behind your
 frog. 

You are the artist – you decide what it all should look like.  Have fun.

 Post a copy of your work in an email or in GC.